Photovoltaik

Self-Assembled Nanotextures Create Antireflective Surface

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The scientists started by coating the top surface of a silicon solar cell with a polymer material called a "block copolymer," which can be made to self-organize into an ordered surface pattern with dimensions measuring only tens of nanometers. The self-assembled pattern served as a template for forming posts in the solar cell like those in the moth eye using a plasma of reactive gases - a technique commonly used in the manufacture of semiconductor electronic circuits.

The resulting surface nanotexture served to gradually change the refractive index to drastically cut down on reflection of many wavelengths of light simultaneously, regardless of the direction of light impinging on the solar cell.

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"Adding these nanotextures turned the normally shiny silicon surface absolutely black," Rahman said.

Solar cells textured in this way outperform those coated with a single antireflective film by about 20 percent, and bring light into the device as well as the best multi-layer-coatings used in the industry.

"We are working to understand whether there are economic advantages to assembling silicon solar cells using our method, compared to other, established processes in the industry," Black said.

Hidden layer explains better-than-expected performance

One intriguing aspect of the study was that the scientists achieved the antireflective performance by creating nanoposts only half as tall as the required height predicted by a mathematical model describing the effect. So they called upon the expertise of colleagues at the CFN and other Brookhaven scientists to help sort out the mystery.

"This is a powerful advantage of doing research at the CFN—both for us and for academic and industrial researchers coming to use our facilities," Black said. "We have all these experts around who can help you solve your problems."

Using a combination of computational modeling, electron microscopy, and surface science, the team deduced that a thin layer of silicon oxide similar to what typically forms when silicon is exposed to air seemed to be having an outsized effect.

"On a flat surface, this layer is so thin that its effect is minimal," explained Matt Eisaman of Brookhaven's Sustainable Energy Technologies Department and a professor at Stony Brook University. "But on the nanopatterned surface, with the thin oxide layer surrounding all sides of the nanotexture, the oxide can have a larger effect because it makes up a significant portion of the nanotextured material." Said Black, "This 'hidden' layer was the key to the extra boost in performance."

The scientists are now interested in developing their self-assembly based method of nanotexture patterning for other materials, including glass and plastic, for antiglare windows and coatings for solar panels.

This research was supported by the DOE Office of Science.

Brookhaven National Laboratory is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

* Dr. Charles T. Black is a physicist developing new ways to engineer materials for energy applications at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory.

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